CoSpaces for
Parents

What is CoSpaces?

Father and son with a tablet using CoSpaces.

Do your kids love to build? With CoSpaces, they can assemble three-dimensional fantasy worlds, stories or messages.
All it takes is a computer and the free browser app. And that’s not all: They can even dive into their creations in virtual reality. With the CoSpaces app on your smartphone and a cardboard headset you can explore your kids’ masterpieces together.

What your child could do with CoSpaces

Tell stories

Put together scenes to create or retell a story. With the virtual reality mode, you can even become part of those creations.

Design greeting cards

Personal messages can now be three-dimensional: Build 3D greetings cards with your own photos and audio files that can be explored in VR by the happy recipient.

Play in a creative way

There doesn’t always have to be a specific aim. Just playing and experimenting with CoSpaces can be a great way for kids to express their creativity.

You are thinking “Okay, but…”?

Here are some answers to your questions:

Your child can use CoSpaces for free. The browser app contains a variety of objects and environments that don’t involve any costs.
Beyond that, you can buy additional assets from the marketplace – using CoSpaces Coins. Every user gets a few coins as a welcome gift. Additional credit can be added on our website. Your child, however, will only be able to use this paid service with your consent.Anyone signed up to CoSpaces will receive updates on these topics in our regular newsletters.
To create something on CoSpaces, you’ll need a personal computer or a laptop with an internet connection. CoSpaces works in the browser, so there’s no need to download anything. We recommend using the Google Chrome or Firefox browser.
To explore CoSpaces creations in VR, you’ll need a headset and a smartphone with the CoSpaces app. You can download the mobile app for free from the Google Play Store or App Store.
You can find our headset recommendations here.
Virtual reality is a new technology, which means that there are no long-term studies with kids. That’s also why VR hardware providers are cautious with their age limit.
We cannot guarantee that there are no risks involved but would like to quote Prof. Banks, Professor of Optometry, Vision Science, Psychology, and Neuroscience at the University of California: “So far I’ve seen no so-called smoking gun, no concrete evidence that a child of a certain age was somehow adversely affected by wearing a VR headset”, he says in an interview with Digital Trends.
Prof. Banks sees the same dangers for kids using VR that apply to adults, namely:
  • Running into objects while being in VR
  • Cyber sickness
  • Needing some time to adapt to the real world afterwards
To minimize these risks, we suggest that you watch over your kids during their VR experience.

For more tips on VR with kids – including safety measures – read this article.

Got any other questions for us? Feel free to contact us